Category Archives: client service

How Much is a Stamp Worth?

Not the Post Office!
Why not offer pre-postaged tax return and payment envelopes to your clients?

If your answer is “It’s too expensive and takes extra processing,” maybe it’s time to reevaluate the actual value of that stamp.

I recently had the occasion to be a tax preparation client. As a client, my first impression of the return package was favorable – it was nicely packaged and well presented – then I pulled out the return mailing envelope and that impression was gone.

No postage, no address, nothing. Now, mailing this return just became one more aggravation as a trip to the Post Office loomed. It left me with a negative feeling about the return and, by extension, the service provider.

The preparation price was fair at close to a thousand dollars. A few dollars more to cover postage and additional processing wouldn’t have mattered and would have made a much better impression.

I know, you’re thinking it costs too much and then there’s the extra processing to determine postage for each return. Try this to streamline and implement the process.

  • Determine how much postage returns need based on the number of pages and set up a standard chart for processors to use.
  • Add an amount to cover the actual postage plus overhead when you increase fees (you do increase your fees periodically, right? We’ll talk more about that later.) Don’t forget the postage for the return payment envelopes as well.
  • Either scale the increase based on the billing with more being added to more expensive returns based on the premise that they cost more to mail or take an average and add it across all returns.

The value of that postage is much more than a few stamps. To your client, it’s exceptional service that few others offer and to you it’s an impression on your client you couldn’t buy for many times that amount. As for that return I had to mail, it’s a good thing I wasn’t the one who had to mail the check.

Have you done or are planning something similar? Share your thoughts!

Image:Creative Commons

Show the Love: Client Appreciation

Show the Love

Now, it’s time to take a break, catch up on CPE (that would be me) and start thinking of running the business instead of it running you. So many firms seem to keep chasing new clients while all but ignoring those reliable souls who come in year after year. Why not take a little time and keep in touch with them as well?

Take a look at your top clients (see this post for tips) and set up a schedule in your calendar for check in phone calls or even in person visits during the upcoming months. Don’t approach this with the intention to sell them something –just keep in touch. It’s amazing what comes up when you take the time to talk.

Some clients really don’t need or want more than a once a year check in. Remember them by sending a personal email or letter thanking them for their business and reminding them you’re available whenever they need you. A little gratitude goes a long way.

Client appreciation and retention is a low cost, low risk way to strengthen your practice. Done properly, it can increase revenue from additional services as well as referrals. Now is a perfect time to start.

Do you have plans or procedures in place to keep clients? Please share your experiences!

Image:

One Easy Way to Make Clients Happier

This happened a few days ago at a local accounting firm I was visiting, but the principles apply to all professional service businesses.

A client dropped by with a few questions to finish preparing his records and an apology for it being a busy time of year. He took 10-15 minutes of a professional’s time. After showing him in, an administrative employee commented “I hate when they do that” referring to the client’s dropping in without an appointment.

It’s important to know that this firm uses value billing and markets its services by telling clients the flat rate for services includes questions and phone calls. Here are two points to consider, but this scene offers a lot to think about.

  • Value billing is just that – being paid for value delivered. If that client couldn’t have his questions answered, he could easily go to another firm that would be more helpful. If you choose to offer flat rate billing, the rates should include the additional personal time that clients will ask for.
  • The tone and attitude of a firm is subtle but easily transmitted. It struck me that the client felt he had to apologize for requesting a service that had been offered. While the professional who met with him had no reluctance to spend the time, the initial administrative contact was where the displeasure was expressed.

Of the two issues, I think the second is more serious. The tone of any business is either set by its leaders or simply evolves in the absence of strong example. The firm in this case has allowed an attitude of unfriendly “gate keeping” to develop in its administrative staff.

Today is a good day for a check on the attitude your firm transmits. We’ll talk about how to polish that in future posts, but, for now, observe professional and administrative employees when they deal with clients and note the overall tone.

What else do you see in this little scenario? Have you dealt with the same or similar issues? Please share your experiences!

Image: http://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:Dot_not_touch.PNG&oldid=26378712

Are You Secretly Irritating Your Clients?

A Slow Burn
We all have different personalities and communicating styles. That’s a good thing, but it can be a problem when different styles are at odds.

Most professionals have their preferred method of reaching clients and use that with great success in some cases and not so much in others. Let’s have a look and see if we can improve.

There are three categories of contacts:

Written- This includes the obvious like written letters and emails as well as new technologies like texts, Twitter and Linked In.

Verbal- For most of us, the telephone is the standard in this category but it could also include things like interactive chat, tele-meetings and webinars.

In Person- Here’s the old standby of meeting in the same place at the same time. Technology has yet to upgrade this with the possible exception of the virtual meeting.

Sometimes, the nature of the reason for contact dictates the method. For example, formally communicating important points is best in a letter and a sales presentation most likely requires a face to face meeting.

But, what about a quick question to clarify a point on the current project – is that an email, a text or a phone call? The answer is whatever method the client prefers. That’s right, what they want, not what we’re comfortable with.

Lots of people use the telephone and don’t think twice about picking it up to make a call and answer it with no hesitation. There are people who hate talking on the phone and see calls as interruptions. Some clients view a drop in visit as a great chance to talk and others see it as rude and thoughtless. The trick is finding out what your clients want.

The way to do that is to just ask. Most people are happy to tell you what they want and will be thrilled that you asked. Make a note in the file with the contact information and follow their preferences whenever you can.

Try it and see if your clients are happier and prospective clients are more receptive.

For the record, I’m an email kind of person and don’t like talking on the phone. Leave a comment with your preferences and experiences-let’s compare.

Photo: http://www.flickr.com/photos/cibomahto/ / CC BY-SA 2.0